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Francesco Capitummino

Biography:

Francesco Capitummino is a Cambridge European & Osborn Research funded PhD Student.

College: Sidney Sussex
Supervisor: Dr Donal Cooper

Title of research topic:
‘Sculpture in Norman Sicily from Roger II to William II. Palermo, Cefalù and Monreale’.

Aim of his research is to conduct a fresh analysis of Romanesque sculpture in Sicily and to evaluate the contribution that this analysis can make to the understanding of the artistic language of Norman Sicily as a whole.
The timeline of this research starts with the establishment of the Kingdom in 1130 by Roger II and ends with the reign of William II (†1189). This project, while focusing on the centres of Palermo, Cefalù and Monreale will also consider the wider trans-regional and trans-cultural context, which will involve the wider Mediterranean. This approach should offer a new tool to appreciate the sculptural language in the island across the twelfth century and, in turn, to understand further the artistic language as a whole.

Biography:
Francesco read History of Art (BA, 2010; and MA, 2013) at the University of Tuscia (Italy) where he studied under supervision of Prof. Maria Andaloro and Dr. Ruggero Longo. In 2018 he completed a MA in Museum Studies at UCL - University College London under the supervision of Prof. Jeremy Tanner.

Termination details:

Francesco Capitummino is a Cambridge European & Osborn Research funded PhD Student.

College: Sidney Sussex
Supervisor: Dr Donal Cooper

Title of research topic:
‘Sculpture in Norman Sicily from Roger II to William II. Palermo, Cefalù and Monreale’.

Aim of his research is to conduct a fresh analysis of Romanesque sculpture in Sicily and to evaluate the contribution that this analysis can make to the understanding of the artistic language of Norman Sicily as a whole.
The timeline of this research starts with the establishment of the Kingdom in 1130 by Roger II and ends with the reign of William II (†1189). This project, while focusing on the centres of Palermo, Cefalù and Monreale will also consider the wider trans-regional and trans-cultural context, which will involve the wider Mediterranean. This approach should offer a new tool to appreciate the sculptural language in the island across the twelfth century and, in turn, to understand further the artistic language as a whole.

Biography:
Francesco read History of Art (BA, 2010; and MA, 2013) at the University of Tuscia (Italy) where he studied under supervision of Prof. Maria Andaloro and Dr. Ruggero Longo. In 2018 he completed a MA in Museum Studies at UCL - University College London under the supervision of Prof. Jeremy Tanner.