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Agnes Kriza

Agnes  Kriza

Agnes Kriza

Newnham College

Research Area: The Russian icon in the age of European confessionalisation

Supervisor: Prof Richard Marks


Termination details:

Agnes Kriza’s research interests include medieval Russian art, literature and theology, focusing on different contact points of text and image. In her PhD thesis she investigates a sixteenth-century controversy over icons, the so-called Viskovaty affair debating the problem of symbolic representation of the Divine. The aim of her research is to explore the art historical, literary and theological-theoretical background of the defense of allegorical icon-painting by the head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Makary. She also raises the problem of a possible relationship between the European Reformation and the new allegorical tendencies of Russian icon-painting in the mid-sixteenth century. <br />Agnes has published several articles on medieval Slavonic theological literature in Russian, in Hungarian and in English. She is the author of the book &quot;Medieval Russian iconophile texts. Vol. I. The Byzantine heritage”, Budapest 2011. <br />Agnes’s research at Cambridge is funded by the Royalton Kisch Studentship of Newnham College.
https://cambridge.academia.edu/AgnesKriza

Research Interests

Agnes Kriza’s research interests include medieval Russian art, literature and theology, focusing on different contact points of text and image. In her PhD thesis she investigates a sixteenth-century controversy over icons, the so-called Viskovaty affair debating the problem of symbolic representation of the Divine. The aim of her research is to explore the art historical, literary and theological-theoretical background of the defense of allegorical icon-painting by the head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Makary. She also raises the problem of a possible relationship between the European Reformation and the new allegorical tendencies of Russian icon-painting in the mid-sixteenth century.

Agnes has published several articles on medieval Slavonic theological literature in Russian, in Hungarian and in English. She is the author of the book "Medieval Russian iconophile texts. Vol. I. The Byzantine heritage”, Budapest 2011.

Agnes’s research at Cambridge is funded by the Royalton Kisch Studentship of Newnham College.

Key Publications